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Before July 4 1946, a boy disappeared from town. A rumor spread that he had been kidnapped by inhabitants of the building at Planty 7/9. This building sheltered holocaust survivors, most of whom were in transit out of Poland to Palestine and United States.

The boy re-appeared. He alleged he had been held in the cellar of a building in the middle of town. On the morning of July 4th, his father took the boy to the police station to tell his story. On the way they passed one building, 7 Planty Street the boy pointed to a Jewish man in a green hat as one of those who abducted him and taken him into the cellar of this building. There, he insisted, the inhabitants were murdering Christian children. In fact, there was no cellar in the building. It turned out that the boy was visiting his family outside Kielce.

The rumor caused an uproar in the city. As the morning progressed police, militia, army officers and a large crowd gathered at the site. Rioting broke out, and the killing began. Many took part. No one stopped the bloodshed. By the end of the day some 40 Jews had been murdered at 7 Planty Street and another forty or so in the surrounding area. The address, 7 Planty Street, has become synonymous with the pogrom itself.

Until this day no one knows what really happened on that day. While there were trials that resulted in a few executions, and some being imprisoned, the communist government, which had only recently taken power, had no interest in seeking the truth. Documents disappeared, and in communist times a veil of secrecy shrouded the event. Once the regime fell an underground dispute about what happened, going back to the pogrom itself, surfaced.

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